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Twin Atlantic – ‘Transparency’ review: their weirdest, funniest and most appealing album yet

Twin Atlantic – ‘Transparency’ review: their weirdest, funniest and most appealing album yet
Twin Atlantic – ‘Transparency’ review: their weirdest, funniest and most appealing album yet

“The degree of band we are, all that we do is to earn enough to pay the rent. We’ve not had an enormous hit, so we’re actually similar to, ‘We should do another record – I can stand to in any case be in a band.” So Twin Atlantic frontman Sam McTrusty told NME last year behind the stage at Glasgow’s TRNSMT Festival, a homecoming for a demonstration who themselves itself in an in-between state. 2020’s ‘POWER’, their fifth collection, addressed an unmistakable cut at finding that “enormous hit” through overproduced synth-pop – something they could eat out on for quite a long time in the future. But then our meeting tracked down McTrusty, presently a part down after last year’s flight of drummer Craig Kneale going to play the mid-card at the band’s old neighborhood festival.Kneale’s takeoff and tepid gathering to ‘POWER’ maybe likewise sent a shock through Twin Atlantic, bringing about ‘Straightforwardness’, the band’s strangest, most interesting and most engaging delivery to date. Constrained inside by the pandemic, with his better half chipping away at COVID wards, and recording while at the same time caring for his small kid, McTrusty worked from a distance with LA-based companion and teammate Jacknife Lee on tunes that shun the pop heading of ‘Force’, yet in addition the heartless field rock under which Twin Atlantic made their name with 2009 introduction ‘Vivarium’.’Transparency‘ feels spur of the moment and no frills such that the band have seldom endeavored. It isn’t so much that melodies have relatively little moving parts – the creation, the record’s principle strength, is computer game y, frequently pressing endless supply of clamor as tunes arrive at their theme or peak (‘Get Famous’) or utilizing tests (‘Bang On The Gong’) – however the tracks feel threw off, light and fun. McTrusty’s voice, not an especially expressive one for the most part, works successfully with the talkative style he embraces here, matching Lee’s crashing beats to make something that feels crude and tense. Opener Keep Your Head Up is downbeat, sadboi, complaint circulating electro-pop, somewhere close to Arab Strap and Death Cab For Cutie. At times McTrusty’s scornful manner of expression can jostle with his cutout picture – yet it’s never been clear before that he could compose melodies this mindful or interesting, and that is an adequately astounding an encounter to move past any clunkers.The record lists in the center when the speed subsides (on ‘Torment’ and ‘It’s Getting Dark’), yet ‘Straightforwardness’ never exceeds its welcome. It may not create the “huge hit” McTrusty once longed for, yet it’s a sign there’s life in the old canine yet.





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